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Weighing and Measuring Part 2

So how is it going for you? Did you try a week of weighing and measuring? How was it? Was it easy? Hard? Scary?  And here is my big question:

When you weighed and measured, was it enough?

Did you feel satisfied?

Do you need a change?

We may not want to, or know how to do the behaviors that will lead to the changes we want. So, we need to try new behaviors and give them a chance, to see how well they work for us.

Weighing and measuring your food, if you haven’t done it regularly, is a big change. To stop eating the foods you are sensitive to, is probably a bigger change. If you are doing these both at the same time, notice that you will feel a lot of power struggle – from within the body, from within the mind, from your feelings, from other people. Be gentle with yourself, but do not give up.

To stop eating the foods you are sensitive to has consequences. You may feel cravings; you may feel withdrawal. Feelings from the past may come up; negative experiences from any period of your life may surface. What needs to happen so you can handle these?

I could talk a long time about withdrawal – the anxiety, irritability, shakes, mood swings, and so forth. But for today, just notice that withdrawal is proof that you have a physical sensitivity to some, or all, of the foods you removed. It means you are doing the right thing.

The worst part of weighing and measuring is the struggle about it. To decide you are going to weigh and measure all your food can feel like a punishment – you have been a naughty girl/boy and you now must do this. That simply is not true!! You are uniquely you. Your body has some unique needs and sensitivities. I don’t know why for sure, but somehow there is a disconnect that keeps you from knowing what to eat and when to stop. This could be with one food, or some foods, or all foods.

You don’t have to like doing weighing and measuring. Acceptance is not approval. You don’t need to want this. But if you want you to be really, really, free of this food and eating problem, it takes some checking and changing. It’s not hard or painful. Just a bit annoying sometimes. What are the benefits of weighing and measuring?

You will never again have to feel sick because you ate the wrong foods and/or the wrong amounts.

After years of diets and struggles, your sense of the right amounts of food may be a little off. And if you see yourself as a compulsive eater or food addict, the critical part of recovery in peace for you may be a shift in the proportions of the foods you are eating.  When you are not weighing or measuring, it is so easy to get the proportions just a little off, and to start down your slippery slope again.

Many people resist weighing and measuring their food. It seems somehow discriminatory, embarrassing, humiliating to need to do that.

So, if you have not been weighing and measuring for a while, please try an experiment with me. For only one week!

Just weigh and measure all the food you eat or pack at home, for this week only. Put a tablet and pen by your scale. Write notes about what you learn. If you have a food plan, weigh and measure to that food plan. See what it looks like, and notice if it felt like enough when you ate it. If you aren’t currently weighing and measuring or don’t have a food plan, try weighing and measuring your food for just one week and notice the results.

Please, if you are weighing and measuring and it works for you, will you comment below and tell us how it helps? And are there any problems?

And if you don’t usually weigh and measure, please tell us what this week feels like, and ask any questions you have. I will answer all the comments.

And next week, we will talk about following your food plan in front of people who don’t understand it, and how to handle that.

Blessings to you,

Theresa

p.s. – Our great Amanda is ill and will be out of the office for a while.  Please be patient as my husband Jeff will be filling in for her.  We will do our best to answer promptly.

Theresa

2 Responses to Weighing and Measuring Part 2

  1. Janet March 26, 2024 at 11:24 am #

    I mostly weigh my food. Some items don’t fit well in a measuring cup and I want all I can get. I am a compulsive eater, binge eater and bulimic. I’ve not shown to be physically sensitive to any particular foods but I generally avoid some items like sugar. Why eat sugar except for taste? Sugar is non nutritional except for energy and I eat enough nutritional food to give me plenty of energy. I don’t snack, and so i haven’t eaten popcorn for years but I do actually enjoy the smell when I go to a theater. Certain nuts (cashews, peanuts and peanut butter, even the no sugar type) stay on my mind and I spend way too much time thinking, planning, anticipating eating them and I find myself avoiding weighing/measuring them although I’ve never known myself to overeat or go back for ‘more’ since becoming abstinent. It’s not worth the mental obsession that left when I became abstinent over 10 years ago. I don’t often weigh a big bowl of fresh raw salad but most foods are on a plate that is on the scale that is zeroed between each item. When I weigh my foods I KNOW it’s right. I don’t take a scale when I eat out but I do plan ahead and check menus on line before leaving home. I’ve been known to listen to that ‘inner voice’ when eating out and served too much and am traveling and can’t take any home for later meals. Regular weighing at home helps me decide how much is the right amount when I can’t weigh it. Weighing my foods is part of my daily Steps 1-3 surrendering.

    • H. Theresa Wright March 28, 2024 at 12:40 am #

      Beautiful! And TEN years of abstinence, Janet?!! Weighing and measuring – and listening to your “inner voice” are really working well for you!
      Theresa

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